First ever — Fashion Challenge for the Fashion-challenged!

American Classic – Day 24

It’s Friday and that means it’s Quiz time!  Are you ready to think?  Or at least are you ready to Google?  Let’s remember what you’re playing for —

Tommy_hilfigertote

Tommy Hilfiger Tote…

Striped_American_Classic

Sunhat from “The Loft”…

AmericanClassic_sunglasses

Tortoise-shell sunglasses…

All fabulous, all free, all American Classic…  All you have to do is be the first to answer these fashion questions correctly and you will win all three items.  Ready?

1.  What is an A-line skirt?

2.  Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent?

3.  What is a balaclava?  (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.)

4.  What style is a “peasant blouse”?

5.  Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter” come from?

Come on, Mommas!  Your brain can do more than just read Playmobil instructions and remember how to make mini pizzas!  Wake it up, dust it off, run your brain under some water if you have to — but now is the time to use it!

I will post the winner on Saturday — Good luck!

 

 

 

35 Comments

  • 1. An A-line skirt is a skirt that makes an “A”…it’s fitted up top and then flares out as it heads to the knees.
    2. Google says that Hannah Troy invented petite sizes. (Which I understandably didn’t know myself, since I am 5’10″!)
    3. A balaclava is a scarf or head-covering thing that covers just about your whole face. Good for cold weather, or the one day every three years when this Florida girl braves a pair of snow skis.
    4. Hmm…I’m guessing Bohemian. But I haven’t read the book, so it’s just a guess.
    5. Men who manufactured hats used to use mercury in the felting process to stiffen the fabric. It would be absorbed into their bodies and make them go crazy.

  • angela says:

    A line is a skirt that flares out from the waist. It is typically not gathered at the waist.
    Hannah Troy invented the petite size. She was a fashion designer.
    Balaklava is a knit ski mask.
    A peasant blouse is bohemian or traditional wear for certain countries like mexico.
    Mad as a hatter was coined during the fur trading years where hatters used mercury to felt beaver felts. Being exposed to toxic levels of the heavy metal compromised their health.

  • Cheryl says:

    Ok, fine, I’ll do it… but I don’t want any of those insane items from the closet of American Classic Horror Story Episode 11. I know who I am style wise and it is none of those things.
    A line skirt goes from the waist and flares out slightly from hip to knee like the shape of the letter A and also a bell and also a pear shape hider.
    Hannah Troy is a mean, vengeful slut who wanted regular sized women to feel like linebackers by inventing the word “petite” to describe frail, bird like and appealingly cute body types.
    Balaclava: it covers lots of your neck and some of you face. Sounds good for skiing.
    Peasant blouse: the style that doesn’t require a bra per se, and usually blouses in areas that fat lives. Needs no ironing, hopefully.
    Mad as a hatter: some noxious fumes were involved in the making of felt hats from back in the day and it made the slave laborers high as kites. Sounds like it could have been a good job.
    Ok, I did it. You forced me to comment when normally I lurk, unnoticed, guffawing and shaking my head at your hilarious blog.

  • TO working mom says:

    Oh the joy of a quiz that does not involve Lego or Star Wars…

    1. An a-line skirt is one that is fitted at the waist and widens towards the hem. The result is that it gives the impression of the letter A.
    2. Hannah Troy was a fashion designer who invented petite sizing.
    3. A balaclava is a knitted ski mask. We use them all the time here in the Great White North:)
    4.A peasant blouse is a type of shirt with wide puffy sleeves. Think Siegfried and Roy..

    5. Mad as a hatter comes from the fact that the people who worked in the hat factories were exposed to the mercury used in the production of felt. Over time the workers developed dementia caused by mercury poisoning.

  • Bo says:

    1. I can’t say I know that one…

    2. Not one clue or who what

    3. Are you sure it’s not dessert??

    4. Bohemian!!!

    5. Isn’t from the chemicals they put in whatever they use to make hats and made the hatters mad?

    Those are such hard questions….I will be impressed with whoever knows all the answers!

  • Hassanah says:

    I have been waiting for this since the announcement of a give-away! WoooHoo!!!
    Thanks Holl for the chance to win all of those fabulous prizes. You are da bomb.

    Aw shucks, I see now that it goes to the first and since I had two meetings at school this morning, I see that I am late but I will enter anyway. Keep fingers crossed as I super want those items!!!

    Here are my Before Google responses:
    1. What is an A-line skirt? An A-line skirt is a skirt that is wider at the bottom that it is at the waist. It goes in a straight line from the waist to the hem line – mimicking the shape of an uppercase A.
    2. Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent? No idea, but I will guess that she invented a blow dryer since I have one called Helen of Troy. lol
    3. What is a balaclava? (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.) This is a headpiece that covers the head and face, leaving the eyes exposed. Sort of like a ski mask.
    4. What style is a “peasant blouse”? A loose fitting garment that is usually made of a gauzy, lightweight material. The waist is generally left free but I have seen them with an elastic waistband. The sleeves have an elastic wristband.
    5. Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter” come from? No idea, but I would venture to guess that it is because hats are so hard to make and given the whimsies of the fashionista who want this and that, they “hatter” would get very upset with every change they wanted to make!

    Here are my After Google responses:
    1. What is an A-line skirt? “An A-line skirt is a skirt that is fitted at the hips and gradually widens towards the hem, giving the impression of the shape of a capital letter A. The term is also used to describe dresses and coats with a similar shape.” (Hey my not looking at google answer was really close!)
    2. Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent? Hannah Troy was an influential women’s fashion designer and manufacturer who invented the petite size and introduced modern Italian styles to the United States. (Kudos Hannah, learned one thing new today!)
    3. What is a balaclava? (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.) “A balaclava…is a form of cloth headgear that covers the whole head, exposing only part of the face. Often, only the eyes, or eyes and mouth, are left exposed.” (Again, I am pretty darn close! Lol)
    4. What style is a “peasant blouse”? “The term peasant blouse refers to type of women’s blouse with a design based on the traditional dress of Romania, Poland, and other Eupropean countries. In the United States, peasant blouses are best known as a staple of 1960s fashion. Traditionally, peasant blouses were made from white cotton and featured puffed sleeves gathering at the wrist with a square neckline. However, this basic design evolved to include a number of different colors and fabrics as well as off-the-shoulder variations of the look….”
    5. Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter” come from? “Mad as a hatter” is a colloquial phrase used in conversation to refer to a crazy person. In the 18th and 19th century England mercury was used in the production of felt, which was used in the manufacturing of hats common of the time. People who worked in these hat factories were exposed daily to trace amounts of metal, which accumulated within their bodies over time, causing some workers to develop dementia caused by mercury poisoning (called mad hatter syndrome). Thus, the phrase became popular as a way to refer to someone who was perceived as insane.” (Wow, hope our kids do not get with all the felting they do…..however, that WOULD explain some of the craziness!)

    Pick me, pick me. ;)

  • Kris Costello says:

    1. An A-line skirt is a skirt style in women’s clothing characterized by a wider hem that gradually flares out from a fitted hip. This unique design causes the skirt to resemble the overall shape of a capital A.
    2. Hannah Troy was an influential women’s fashion designer and manufacturer who invented the petite size.
    3. A balacava, or ski mask, is a cloth headgear that covers the whole head, exposing only part of the face.
    4. Bohemian.
    5. It is believed to have come about because hatters in the eighteenth and nineteenth century frequently suffered from mercury poisoning. Mercury is a chemical which used to be used in the production of felt hats. It is extremely toxic and can cause symptoms which appear to be similar to ‘madness’.

    Wow! I learned a lot, even if I didn’t win! :)

  • janicemercieri says:

    ^ Which is what I have now after developing my post on my iphone and not on my laptop.

  • Julia says:

    1) a skirt that comes out from the hips (shaped like an “A”). This is good for pear-shaped bodies.

    2) petite sizing

    3) ski mask

    4) a flowy top, often with 2 strings coming from the neck or gathering at the waist or at the sleeves but not necessarily!

    5) Mercury used to be used in the making of hats and it would make hat-makers act strangely!

  • ajdillinger says:

    1. An a-line skirt is a simple skirt with no embellishments that gradually widens from the hip to the hem.
    2. Hannah Troy was the fashion designer who invented the petite size.
    3. A balaclava is a ski mask (covers the head and face, minus the eyes).
    4. A peasant blouse is bohemian style (made popular by hppies).
    5. When hats were first being manufactured the felt contained mercury. Hat factory workers were exposed to mercury and over time the accumulation in their systems caused dementia, hence the term “mad as a hatter”.

    DO I WIN?! Do I get bonus points for typing all that with one hand while holding a baby?

  • WHO? says:

    Scary that I know all this, but thanks go to my grandmother – a genius of a woman and a great teacher!

    1. Shaped like an “A” – fitted at the hips and widens to the hem.
    2. Hannah Troy invented petites.
    3. A ski mask where only the eyes are visible.
    4. A shirt with wide, puffed sleeves that are then gathered at the wrist. (Sometimes includes an embroidered neckline.)
    5. Oh man – this is because mercury exposure caused mood swings in hat makers since it used to be in hat-making.

  • Care says:

    I know some of these off the top of my head.
    An A-line skirt is fuller at the hem than at the waistline, like the letter A.
    A bacaclava is a religious covering that is long sleeve and to the ground.
    A peasant blouse is loose and flowing, usually with long sleeves with an elastic cuff, has no collar and usually some kind of tie at the neckline (not a men’s tie, a ribbon or something)
    Had to go google these
    Hannah Troy, who invented petite sizing, is my new hero.
    The term mad as a hatter comes from hat factories in England that used mercury. The workers were exposed to the mercury which caused dementia (thank you wikipedia.)

  • janicemercieri says:

    1. It is a woman’s skirt that is flat across the front and gradually widens to a full hem. It is fitted and usually has no embellishments. It is object in which i learned how to sew a zipper in for the first time. Eighteen redos to be exact. My 7th grade home ec teacher, Mrs. Thompson was a stickler for perfection.

    2. She was a fashion designer and manufacturer that invented “petite” sizing. (God Bless her heart). She took Italian designs and mass produced them. Thus bringing the “classic” look in to the mainstream market.

    3. Besides a great dessert and a town in the Ukraine, it is also the name for a winter hat/mask/scarf/neck warmer. This baby is like putting a long tube over your head that you can wear in a multitude of ways. It is the crown jewel of turtleneck and head wear in the winter. You can get yourself one out of 100% USA polar fleece (that does not come from polar sheep) for only $15 instead of $25 from redbow.com if you mention this blog (expires 6/15/13).

    4. Flashback to high school here. It is a type of shirt that has wide puffy (short or long) sleeves with elastic on the ends. It is loose fitting and garners that casual carefree image if the 60’s. The design was based on the traditional dress of Romania and other Eastern Europe areas. The look especially stunning accessorized with the love beads.

    5. Mad as a hatter is a phrase used to reference a crazy person. In early England mercury was used in hat
    factories. Exposed workers received mercury poisoning and developed dementia.

  • June Joseph says:

    p.s. I forgot to say I love your blog :)

  • jenniferhirchert@gmail.com says:

    worse = wore*

  • jenniferhirchert@gmail.com says:

    What is an A-line skirt?
    An A-line skirt is a skirt that is fitted at the hips and gradually widens towards the hem, giving the impression of the shape of a capital letter A.

    Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent?
    Hannah Troy is a fashion designer who invented the petite size.

    What is a balaclava? (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.)
    Ski mask that can be worn in different ways and makes you look like a burglar.

    What style is a “peasant blouse”?
    A woman’s blouse similar to what European peasant worse, with a square neckline and puffy sleeves.

    Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter” come from?
    Mercury used to be used in the making of hats. This was known to have affected the nervous systems of hatters, causing them to tremble and appear insane.

  • michellerams says:

    1. A line skirts have the shape of an “A”, narrower on the top, wider on the bottom.
    2. Hannah Troy invented the petite size.
    3. A Balaclava is a type of headgear that only leaves your eyes exposed, like a ski mask.
    4. Peasant blouses are very bohemian!
    5. The expression “Mad as a Hatter” comes from English hat factories where mercury in the felt used to make hats poisoned some of the factory works causing dementia.

  • Heidi J says:

    1. An A-line skirt is skirt shaped like a capital A. It narrow at the top and wider at the bottom, but still fairly tailored.

    2. Hannah Troy invented the petite size.

    3. A balaclava is a ski mask.

    4. A peasant blouse is loose, flow-y blouse styled after the shirts peasants used to wear.

    5. “Mad as a hatter” comes from hatters using mercury in making their hats, which poisoned them and caused them to go crazy.

  • JK says:

    1. Fits at the hips and widens at the hem- no pleats, etc. . .
    2. A fashion designer and invented the petite size
    3. Cloth headgear exposes a part of the face or ski mask
    4. Any of the styles, bohemian, earthy, sporty, American chic, Euro chic, etc. . .
    5. Phrase refers to a crazy person. During the 18th and 19th century, mercury was in felt which they made hats out of. The people assembling the hats would get mercury in their bodies which caused dementia, etc. . . And they would be called mad as a hatter.

  • Raia says:

    1. A cute way to hide wide hips : ) Falls away from the waist at an angle.

    2. Pants for short women, peities

    3. A must-have in northern Minnesota, a ski mask

    4. Bohemian

    5. The glue used to make hats made the hatters crazy, I think.

  • Hannah Tate says:

    1.wikipedia says – An A-line skirt is a skirt that is fitted at the hips and gradually widens towards the hem, giving the impression of the shape of a capital letter A.
    2. Hannah Troy invented the petite size, I did not know that because I am NOT petite sized.
    3. A balaclava is kind of like ski mask thingy
    4.I would say a peasant blouse it bohemian, but i guess it could also be romantic
    5.Again from wikipedia – I could paraphrase, but this is pretty funny – “Mad as a hatter” is a colloquial phrase used in conversation to refer to a crazy person. In 18th and 19th century England mercury was used in the production of felt, which was used in the manufacturing of hats common of the time. People who worked in these hat factories were exposed daily to trace amounts of the metal, which accumulated within their bodies over time, causing some workers to develop dementia caused by mercury poisoning (called mad hatter syndrome). Thus, the phrase became popular as a way to refer to someone who was perceived as insane.

  • Heather says:

    1. The A line skirt is fitted in the hips but widens toward the hem, making it look like the letter “A”
    2. Hannah Troy was a fashion designer/manufacturer. She invented petite sizes.
    3. A balaclava is a mask that covers the entire head, only showing part of the face…like a ski mask.
    4. The peasant blouse is bohemian.
    5. Mercury used to be used in the production of felt so people who manufactured hats were exposed to it regularly which caused mercury poisoning and dementia.

  • rebecca says:

    1. What is an A-line skirt?
    An A-line skirt is one designed in the shape of an A; fitted at the waist, skimming over the hips and widening as it lengthens. This achieves the effect of making the wearer’s legs look as skinny and gangly as possible, while creating the illusion that the wearer’s backside is triangular. For an example of this style, see the sign for female washrooms.

    2. Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent?
    Hannah Troy is the bitch who invented the notion of the “petite” size; unfortunately this dastardly concept still stays with is today, forcing leagues of women under 5’4″ to shop in a “short ghetto” populated with capri pants and “bracelet length” twinsets.

    3. What is a balaclava? (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.)
    While my European husband insists that a balaclava is a desert worthy of serving on one’s head (watch out for dripping honey), as a Canadian I know it is a useful knitted head covering that enables northerners everywhere to go play outside in the Winter. Named after a battle in the Crimean war (where soldiers needed protection from the harsh weather) the balaclava’s appeal has spread to the four corners of the earth because of it’s ability to protect the wearer from being identified. It remains a perennial favourite among bank robbers and political assassins everywhere.

    4. What style is a “peasant blouse”?
    The term “peasant blouse” refers to a loose, (usually white) sack of a shirt, usually featuring a neckline of floral diarrhea embroidery that is supposedly popular among traditionally exploited populations (i.e. the poor exotic brown people of Cental and South America and the Carribean). What most North Americans fail to realize is that these blouses are, in fact, worn by nobody in those places. They are an invention of revenge, designed to make the white women of North America look like overgrown toddlers who have lumpy potatoes for breasts.

    5. Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter”come from?
    The term “mad as a hatter” (colloquial term for a crazy person) was born in Victorian England due to the popularity beaver felt hats; the felt was often treated with Mercury, and the workers who made the hats (unprotected) were often left with acute toxicity (not to be confused with “Beaver Fever,” a toxic syndrome of an entirely different sort) and a resulting slew of behaviours that made them seem insane. The term “mad as a hatter” came into popularity after use by several authors, the most notable being children’s author/pederast Lewis Carroll, who created the Character of the Mad Hatter in his drug-fuelled psychedelic head trip “Alice in Wonderland.” It should be noted that felt hats experienced a real decline in popularity after the publishing of Carroll’s story; one has to wonder if it had a negative impact on the public’s view of both hatters and hats. It is interesting to note this public distrust of hats still exists today,and is occasionally exacerbated by the creations of Phillip Treacy (see Royal Weddings).

  • H Wise says:

    1. An A-line skirt is a skirt that has the silhouette of an A, tight at the waist and tapered out toward the bottom. No frilly tulip-bottoms.
    2.Hannah Troy was a fashion designer who invented the ‘petite’ size. Useless for many people.
    3.A balaclava is a head covering with holes for the eyes/mouth. Keeps you warm in really cold weather. Also used in bank robberies.
    4.Peasant blouse is a shirt that usually has a wide neck opening, wide sleeves, and sometimes a placket over the upper chest area. Good for breastfeeding or hiding belly pudge.
    5.Mad as a hatter refers to the fact that many hat makers in the past centuries became wacky because of the chemicals used in the hat-making process. Known mostly from Alice in Wonderland, but most mad hatters probably weren’t that entertaining.

  • June Joseph says:

    1.A skirt that is fitted at the hips and widens at the hem. 2. Women’s fashion designer, invented the petite size. 3. Headgear that covers the whole head with an opening for the eyes. 4. A blouse with puffed sleeves that are gathered at the wrist, gathered at the waist, sometimes has embroidery. 5. Supposedly came from hat makers in the 18th & 19th century who were exposed to mercury poisoning from the mercury used in making felt hats.

  • Mommy Sommie says:

    1. A skirt shaped like a capital ‘A’ i.e. narrow in the waist and wider at the hem.
    2. Fashion designer who invented the ‘petite’ size in women’s clothing.
    3. Something my Dad used to wear when he’d walk home from work in the winter! (Erm, and now I better clarify, no, he wasn’t a burglar!) A complete head and neck covering, traditionally made from black wool, that only allows for the eyes and mouth to be seen.
    4. I’d know one to see one, but tricky to define. It is based on old-fashioned women’s ‘peasant’ dresses. It is usually identified by gathered sleeves and a gathered neckline and embroidery.
    5. I thought it was from Alice in Wonderland but after a quick internet search the origins of the phrase seem unclear, although the most likely seems to be that hat-making used to involve mercury which would then cause hat-makers to develop “hatter’s shakes” and anxiety as a result of mercury poisoning.

    (P.S. I really want to win but was interrupted about 6 times during typing this to separate Lego pieces. Ah, motherhood!)

  • Kathleen says:

    1. An A-line skirt is narrower at the waist then widens steadily until it reaches the hem (usually knee-ish length). Like the letter A.
    2. Hannah Troy is a designer who invented petite sizes. Not that I’ve ever worn those!
    3. One of those scarf-based head pieces that you wear to look cool, avoid skin cancer or to observe religious rules of your culture. Also for skiing.
    4. Boho?
    5. Mad Hatter…a while back, people who mad hats used mercury in the process. After a while, they went nuts from the poison. Also from Alice in Wonderland.

    Fun!

  • Lesia says:

    1. a skirt that’s fitted at the hips and widens towards the hem and resembles a capital “A” hence the name
    2. she was a women’s clothing designer and manufacturer who invented the petite size
    3. cloth headgear that covers the whole head leaving only parts of the face exposed eg eyes and nose
    4. a style of women’s blouse based on European folk/traditional costumes, with puffed sleeves and a wide neckline (often square) and it may be gathered at the waist
    5. because of the neurological signs and symptoms of mercury toxicity from milliners’ occupational overexposure to mercury, which was used for the production of felt, which was used in millinery, in the 18th and 19th century in England

  • Karen L says:

    Ok, I’ll play (btw, found you from Ain’t no mom jeans!) 1) skirt shaped like an “A” (and does nothing for me) 2) OMG, no wonder I never knew what she invented as I’ve never shopped this section, PETITE Size! 3) Thank you Wikipedia, Ski Mask 4) A shirt that is poufy and that I love but probably shouldn’t 5) The hat making process used to make people mad, not just angry but certifiable… incidentally, it is the same way I feel trying to wear a hat…

  • Anne says:

    1. A skirt that is fitted at the waist/hips and widens out like the letter A (can be a dress too)

    2. She invented the ‘petite size’

    3. A facemask used to protect your face from cold (for sports sometimes) or fire (dangerous activities)

    4. Bohemian

    5. From hat factory workers who got mercury poisoning and ‘went crazy’ (sad!)

    This is so fun and nice to think about something besides kids and toys as you said. Thanks for sharing, it’s so fun to follow your blog!

  • Lara says:

    Ok, here I go

    A Line skirt is a skirt that follows the lines of me letter A. Straight down at an angle from the hips.

    Hannah Troy is the inventor of petite sizes and also brought Italian styles to America

    Balaclava is a hat that covers the face and neck too, my friend knit these for our CSA farmers up here in western mass for cold winters!

    Peasant blouse is definitely bohemian!!!

    Mad as a hatter is from when hat makers got metal poisoning from mercury that was used in producing felts at the time. They would go a little but crazy. Seems appropriate for some crazy hats from England!

    Love that you’re doing this! And I must say, you looked great in the purple argyle yesterday, very happy to be wearing it!

  • Rebecca says:

    1. What is an A-line skirt? a skirt that has an A shape. Smaller at the top and flares out at the bottom (around the knee)

    2. Who is Hannah Troy and what did she invent? Petite sizes

    3. What is a balaclava? (hint: It is not a yummy Greek dessert.)
    knitted cap: a close-fitting knitted covering for the head and neck that leaves only the face or eyes exposed

    4. What style is a “peasant blouse”? Bohemian

    5. Where did the expression, “Mad as a hatter” come from? Back in the day the people who made hats (millners? hatters?) handled a lot of felt which at the time had mercury in it and it drove them insane. Hence mad as a hatter.

Comments? Fire away.